Rick Moran writes, of the Tea Parties, that he has “been very critical of those in the tea party movement who seek to use anger and fear as a wedge to gain support for their cause.”  The implicit assumption here is that anger is somehow an inappropriate response to recent political events.  Excuse me?  Let’s take one example: ObamaCare.  In my judgment, the Democrats passed a bill which was:

  • Profoundly immoral.
  • Ruinously impractical.
  • Defended mendaciously.
  • Supported corruptly.
  • Enacted through procedural abuse, in the face of strong public opposition.

Exactly which of these things should I not be angry about?  Anger is a response to perceived injustice.  Condemning anger means one of two things: either the object of the anger is not in fact an injustice, or we should be emotionally indifferent to questions of right and wrong.

Moran goes on to note that “that reason wins a lot more converts than screaming” — which is true.  But reason and anger are not mutually exclusive.  The appropriate response to our current political situation is anger, rationally grounded. It is the rational identification of the facts which gives rise to the anger, and the anger provides the motivation to act to correct the injustice.  This is not an academic exercise.  Our lives are, quite literally, at stake.  If we’re not allowed to get emotional about that, when is anger appropriate?

One Response to “Anger”
  1. Merwin Haight Jr says:

    Anger worked in the years following up to 1774. It was tempered with reason, by those brave enough to lead the masses.
    Is it time for such a reaction again? Maybe… but with reason and passion as the world is no longer run by Kings & Queens, but is run by major corporations & banks. Money changes things in that anger is turned into profit without reason, buying guns and such things. Reason is buying a membership to groups like the Tea Party. Reason tempered with passion is needed today.

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